Wednesday, August 29, 2012

Isaac's Dangerous Impacts Persist


Isaac's Dangerous Impacts Persist

Chris Dolce, Jon Erdman, Nick WiltgenUpdated 25 mins agoweather.com
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Isaac Bringing Heavy Rain

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Isaac weakened to a tropical storm Wednesday afternoon while spinning slowly to the west-northwest over southern Louisiana. Since Isaac is moving at a snail's pace, the storm will continue to produce significant impacts along the northern Gulf Coast including storm surge flooding, heavy rainfall, strong winds and possible isolated tornadoes through Thursday.
(MORE: Photos of the damage | Isaac's storm reports)
Friday through the weekend ahead, Isaac's remnants will spin out of the South and into the Midwest. You can find a detailed look at the timing and impacts at this link.
(MORE: Live updates and analysis on Isaac)
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Projected Path Tropical Storm Isaac

Projected Path

Projected Path

Projected Path
Storm surge- Dangerous storm surge will persist through Wednesday night along the southeast Louisiana and Mississippi coasts. A storm surge of 10.9 feet above normal tide levels was reported at Shell Beach, La. to the southeast of New Orleans. In Waveland, Miss., a storm surge of 8 feet above normal tide levels was recorded.
(MAP: Storm surge forecast)
Flooding rains- Isaac's slow movement will result in widespread rainfall amounts of 6 to 12 inches in eastern/central Louisiana, southeastern/central Arkansas and the southwestern half of Mississippi. Along and to either side of the Mississippi/Louisiana border, storm totals of 12 to 24 inches are possible; some locations could see historic rainfall amounts of up to 30 inches. Flooding is occurring across much of the region.
(MORE: Gulf flood threat)
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Power Outage Potential

Power Outage Potential

Power Outage Potential

Power Outage Potential
Power outages- The long duration of strong winds has already knocked out power to hundreds of thousands. Additional power outages are possible into Thursday until Isaac's winds finally slacken. Power outages could last for days in some areas.
Tornadoes- Isolated tornadoes will continue to be possible in parts of southeast Louisiana, southern Mississippi and southwest Alabama through Wednesday night. Thursday, the threat of isolated tornadoes will expand to include much of Mississippi, western Alabama, eastern Louisiana and a large portion of Arkansas.
(MORE: Tornado threat forecast)
Graphics displaying the latest radar, winds, storm information, satellite imagery, watches/warnings and computer model tracks are all below.
(TRACK ISAAC: Interactive hurricane tracker)
View more expert analysis from Senior Meteorologist Stu Ostro at our Tropical Update article.
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Radar

Radar

Radar

Radar

Current Radar

The latest radar imagery is shown to the left. You can also select interactive radar and see how much rainfall has fallen in the last 24 hours using the links below.
- Animated Radar Loop
- Interactive Radar Loop
- 24-Hour Rainfall Totals

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Current Winds

Current Winds

Current Winds

Current Winds

Current Winds and Wave Heights

Darker blue and purple shaded locations are experiencing the strongest winds. Hourly wind gusts are also plotted on the map. You can access a graphic showing the current wave heights using the second link below.
- Current Winds
- Current Wave Heights

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Storm Information

Storm Information

Storm Information

Storm Information

Storm Information

So, where exactly is the cyclone's center located now? If you're plotting the storm along with us, you can view the current information map to get the latitude/longitude coordinates, distance away from the nearest land location, maximum sustained winds and central pressure (measured in millibars).
- Enlarge Map

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Satellite

Satellite

Satellite

Satellite

Enhanced Satellite

How does the system look on satellite imagery? Click on "enhanced" satellite imagery, to see how "cold" the cloud tops are. Brighter oranges and reds shadings concentrated near the center of circulation signify a healthy tropical cyclone.
- Enhanced Satellite Loop
- Interactive Satellite Loop
- Visible Satellite Loop

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Tropical Storm/Hurricane Watches

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Watches

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Watches

A tropical storm watch means that tropical storm conditions, with sustained winds from 39 to 73 mph, are possible in your area within the next 48 hours. A hurricane watch means that hurricane conditions, with sustained winds of 74 mph or higher, are possible in your area within 48 hours.
- Enlarge Map

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Tropical Storm/Hurricane Warnings

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Warnings

Tropical Storm/Hurricane Warnings

A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the specified area in the next 36 hours. A hurricane warning means that hurricane conditions are expected somewhere within the specified area in 36 hours or less.
- Enlarge Map

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